Browse Month: October 2014

Web server application attIt

It is common knowledge that Web server application attlt is common knowledge that Web server application attacks have become common in today’s digital information sharing age. Understanding the implications and vulnerabilities of such attacks, as well as the manner in which we may safeguard against them is paramount, because our demands on e-Commerce and the Internet have increased exponentially. In this assignment, you will examine the response of both the U.S. government and non-government entities to such attacks have become common in today’s digital information sharing age. Understanding the implications and vulnerabilities of such attacks, as well as the manner in which we may safeguard against them is paramount, because our demands on e-Commerce and the Internet have increased exponentially. In this assignment, you will examine the response of both the U.S. government and non-government entities to such attacks.

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Inventory Management Homework Set

You work in the administration of a major hospital in the Twin Cities. One of your tasks is the scheduling of one of the operating rooms in the hospital. The room is used for a specific elective surgery. You allocate a certain amount of time for a surgery; if the actual duration of the surgery exceeds the allocated time, the surgery scheduled next has to start later, and this usually results in overtime at the end of the day where surgery personnel have to stay late into the evening hours. If the actual duration of the surgery is less than the allocated time, the operating rooms remains idle until the next scheduled surgery, since the required resources for the surgery to start (staff, surgeon, equipment, patient) do not become available earlier.

You currently allocate 90 minutes for each surgery (from the beginning until the room is ready for the next patient). However, surgeons and personnel have voiced their opinion that they believe this is not enough time – too often do they run over, and too often do they have to stay late to resolve schedule overruns. The higher levels of the administration agree, since overtime work is generally associated with higher costs as well as possibly worse patient outcomes. You decide to manage this process more rigorously, and download data on 200 completed surgeries that contains information on the actual durations of the surgeries (beginning until the room is ready again), as well as some data on which surgery team was involved, and some patient specific data (Body Mass Index, or BMI of patient), see Surgery Data.xls.

Question 1: Your higher level managers in the hospital tell you that surgeries should finish within the allocated time 99% of all times. Calculate the amount of time you should allocate per surgery to make that happen. How much safety buffer is included in this number? (Note that the safety buffer is the difference between your allocated time, and the time it would take to complete the surgery on average)

Question 2: You try to understand the precise cost factors associated with allocating too much and too little time to a surgery. While opinions diverge, most of your colleagues tell you that a minute of being overtime is about 3 times as bad as a minute of finishing early. Can you use this information to revise how much total time (and buffer time) you would allocate to a surgery?

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Assess the success or failure Starbuck’s has had from an integrative perspective. How does Starbuck’s strategy work?

Assess the success or failure Starbuck’s has had from an integrative perspective.

How does Starbuck’s strategy work?

How well does the company deal with internal weakness and internal advantages?

How well has the company done in seizing upon external opportunities, and handled outside threats by leveraging its strengths?

At the same time, how has its weaknesses exacerbated the threats and cause them to fail to take advantage of opportunities?

Has the company realized the mission and vision through dealing with exogenous threats and external opportunities?

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What are the differences in how bottleneck and non-bottleneck work centers are

1. What are the differences in how bottleneck and non-bottleneck work centers are scheduled under TOC? Why are these differences desirable?

2. Why should buffers be located in front of bottleneck work centers under TOC scheduling? How should the size of the buffers be determined?

3. What are the implications of not allocating material in a shop order after availability checking?

4. Provide some examples of static and dynamic scheduling problems.

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management, communication, culture and leadership.

1)The most obvious model introduced by thinking about organizations as “organisms” is the “life cycle” — new organizations come into being, mature, age, and die, just live all living things from amoebas to people. But it’s a lot harder for us to tell the “organic age” of an organization than it is that of a person (the same could be said for our telling the age of an amoeba, I suppose, but presumably other amoebas manage to do so). It’s even harder when you’re dealing with an organization which doesn’t have clear formal transition points. For example, the US military has been around for some 200+ years, and isn’t likely to pass away anytime soon. Ditto a lot of big companies. The “life cycle” model that’s quite informative when applied to Silicon Valley start-ups or online universities doesn’t help much, on the overall level.

But, there’s no question that within any large more-or-less permanent organization there’s a lot of coming and going – some parts are on the rise, some are going down. Virtually all of you have moved around between units, and I suspect that it hasn’t taken you long to tell the difference between an operation that’s “young” and one that’s “old”. So here’s the question: how do you tell the difference? And to what degree do the ways we tell the difference between an organization or organizational component that’s in the earlier stages of its “life cycle” and one that’s in the later stages resemble the ways we assess the life stages of individuals? Are there organizational analogues to gray hair and wrinkles? Are there transitions or clear changes that tell us our organization is aging? And finally, are we as individuals affected by the “age” of our organization, and if so, what do we do about it?

2) The brain metaphor is most useful in helping us to think about the idea of “knowledge” and how organizations create, maintain, and communicate data, information, and knowledge. Useful on some large levels, but it breaks down pretty quickly when we start to think about “units of knowledge” and the mechanics of transfer. In the organism, all its knowledge is the property of all parts of the system, with some minor qualifications. Your liver isn’t going to accept a better offer from your friend and go off to join him, taking with it all your knowledge about how to turn blood toxins into bile. But in the organization, knowledge is generally pretty clearly compartmentalized into human-sized chunks that move around individually, don’t always mesh well with each other, and often get very proprietary. Brains don’t have any internal issues of “intellectual property” — but organizations certainly do!So here’s the question: Is organizational knowledge basically equivalent to the knowledge possessed by the individuals in the organization? Or is there maybe something rather different involved? Are there aspects of managing organizational knowledge that go beyond — and maybe even sometimes conflict with — managing individuals who embody that knowledge? If you have any stories about these problems, it might be helpful to share them if you can.

Finally (and thinking about this part is strictly voluntary) – is this metaphor perhaps dangerous? We can’t really go too far wrong using the machine or organism metaphors – the worst that can happen is that they’re incomplete and leave stuff unaccounted for. But might not thinking of an organization as a “brain” lead us to some really misleading conclusions about organizational information and knowledge? Or am I just blowing this out of proportion?

3) Human beings love stories. Well, perhaps cats and polar bears also love stories, but since few of us speak cat or polar bear, we’re not really in a position to appreciate them in the same way. In all places and at all times, stories are the most effective medium of human learning – vastly more effective than any kind of direct instruction or advice or even modeling behavior. Stories take us intact inside situations, and let us participate in these situations in relatively trauma-free ways. In many ways, culture can be seen simply as a collection of more or less similar stories told by those on the inside to those whom they would have join them. Learning the culture is in fact learning the stories that define the culture. For the most part, this transmission of culture is not self-conscious – that is, neither those telling the stories nor those hearing them are consciously trying to transmit culture.

All of us who have had the experience of moving from one organization to another have experienced cultural shifts. Likewise, by the time we reach adulthood, most of us have considerable facility in moving into and joining new cultures, and we generally don’t think a whole lot about it, unless the differences between the old and new cultures are fairly dramatic. The reason we don’t need to think a lot about it is that we are carefully attuned to listening to the stories, even if they’re not being told directly to us, and extracting lessons from them — it’s one of the most basic human skills.

Think a little bit about the issue of stories and culture and see if you can understand how this works in a more systematic way then you’re accustomed to. Think back on some cultural change you’ve been part of in the not too distant past (or the distant past, if that’s more informative) and see if you can remember some key brief story that was particularly important to you in helping you learn how to be part of the new culture. It might be something told directly to you, or maybe something you just learned about. If you can, try to describe this story briefly to your colleagues. What was it about? Who was involved? What was its moral? Was it intended to be instructive, or was it accidentally so? What made it particularly instructive to you? Why do you remember it? If you don’t have a story of your own, please participate by asking questions of those who do have stories. Try to get them to be more analytical, and more informative. And feel free to offer your own comments and suggestions about what makes stories memorable and instructive, about the uses that managers might make of these culture transmission mechanisms, and about any other aspect of the process of entering and learning organizational cultures. I’ll be most interested to see what we come up with here.

4) There’s a body of literature devoted to a concept called “Substitutes for Leadership”. Basically, the idea is that organizations can develop a set of structural characteristics and cultivate characteristics in their members such that actual “leadership” on the part of particular individuals is either unnecessary or, in some cases, actually undermined. There are three sets, briefly:

– Characteristics of Subordinates: Ability and experience, Need for independence, professional orientation, and Indifference towards rewards
– Characteristics of Tasks: Routineness, Availability of feedback, and Intrinsic satisfaction
– Characteristics of Organization: Formalization, Group cohesion, Inflexibility, and Rigid reward structure

You can read more about this approach if it interests you at http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/468041-1.html, but it’s not really necessary to discuss this question; you get the general idea. If the organization has a strong management culture, the work is heavily structured, and the individuals are internally motivated toward doing the job, then active leadership may be more of a hindrance than a help. What this really amounts to is making the political system of the organization less subject to individual manipulation.

So what do you think of this idea? Are leaders always really necessary, or can we make things work ok even if we don’t have them? What sorts of situations might be helped by cultivating such a “substitute leadership” environment? Are there situations where this might be a bad thing? What about you personally – do you want a leader, or would you prefer essentially to be your own leader? It’s one way to make organizations less political – but is it worth it? What do you think?

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Peer dynamics

Understanding peer dynamics is a very important aspect of child relationships, especially when the child reaches the teenage years. These peer group dynamics become a powerful tool for shaping behavior in positive and negative ways.

Using the module readings, the Argosy University online library resources, and the Internet, research peer group socialization mechanisms and peer group dynamics. Then, do the following:

  • Select one age group to which you want to apply your analysis of peer group socialization mechanisms and dynamics.
  • Select one of the following:
    • One peer-group mechanism (such as reinforcement, modeling, punishment, or apprenticeship)
    • One peer-group dynamic (such as inclusion/exclusion, clique inclusionary/exclusionary techniques, bullies and victims, gangs, peer collaboration, tutoring, or counseling)

Based on your choices and research, respond to the following:

  • Explain how your chosen mechanism or dynamic for one child shapes the behavior of another. For example, how does the reinforcement of one child’s behavior impact the behavior of another child?
  • How could some of the following developmental tasks of your chosen age group be influenced positively or negatively by your selected mechanism or dynamic?
    • Belonging needs
    • Social interaction
    • Self-image
    • Getting along with others
    • Moral and value development
    • Personal independence

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Resources of Communication

Choose an advertisement and elaborate on how the ad uses verbal and non-verbal resources of communication. The analysis should include a discussion on what features are intensified or downplayed and how. Terms associated with language intensification such as association, repetition, and composition and terms associated with downplay such as components of double-speak—omission, confusion, jargon, euphemism—should be addressed.

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Amy Touchstone

Amy Touchstone Wants to Shape Up the Club

Amy Touchstone, 27, is feeling great these days, having

just been promoted to director of operations at

the East End Athletic Club. For two years previously

she worked as an administrator and receptionist at

the club, which offers a wide range of fi tness equipment,

ten indoor tennis courts, six squash courts,

one basketball court, and a variety of fi tness programs

including massages.

Reporting to Touchstone is a staff of ten people,

three of whom are full-time workers, and seven of

whom are part-timers. Her main responsibilities are

to ensure that the club is running smoothly, outside

of athletic programs and marketing. The billing offi

ce and custodial staff report to Touchstone.

When Touchstone asked her boss, the club manager,

what she was supposed to accomplish as the

director of operations, she was told, “East End isn’t

nearly as effi cient, clean, and sharp as it should be

for the rates we charge. So go fi x it.” Touchstone

liked these general directives, but she thought that

she would need to arrive at a few specifi c ideas for

improvement.

Based on a technique she learned in a marketing

course, Touchstone decided to dig into the responses

in the club member suggestion box that is located at

the front desk. Amy dug back into three months of

suggestions. The key themes for improving the club

as revealed by these suggestions were as follows:

■ Stop charging us for everything, such as using

the tennis courts, if we are already paying hefty

monthly dues.

■ The men’s locker room is horrible because of the

way the guests throw their towels on the fl oor.

These guys have no respect for the club.

■ Some of the staff don’t seem interested in the

members. Sometimes they are talking to each

other when they should be paying attention to us.

We are put on hold far too often when we call the

club.

■ Some of the people who work here act like they

are doing us a favor to let us use the facilities.

Amy reviewed the negative themes she found

among the suggestions, and then discussed them

with Joe Pellagrino, a fi tness coach whom she had

known for several years. Pellagrino said, “Don’t

worry about a handful of complainers. Only the

people with a gripe bother to put something in the

suggestion box.”

Amy thought to herself, “Joe could have a point.

Yet those suggestions seem pretty important. I

should start taking action on improvements tomorrow.

I have to think of a good way to approach the

staff.”

Questions

  1. What personal characteristics of a leader should

Touchstone emphasize in bringing about improvements

in the operation of the East End

Athletic Club?

 

  1. What leadership roles (review Chapter 1) should

Touchstone emphasize in bringing about improvements

in the operation of the club?

 

  1. What do you recommend that Touchstone do

next to carry out her leadership responsibility of

improving operations?

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Computer literacy

 

  • Please select from one of the following topics, which are addressed in the course textbook, Introduction to Computer Literacy:
    • Collaborative Technologies (Chapter 1)
    • Ethical Concerns in Computing (Chapter 1)
    • The Digital Divide (Chapter 1)
    • Open Source Software (Chapter 3)
    • The Impact of Mobile Computing (Chapter 4)
    • Social Networks (Chapter 7)
    • Protecting Copyrights and Intellectual Property (Chapter 8)
    • Plagiarism and Online Education (Chapter 8)
    • The Future of Cloud Computing (Chapter 9)
  • Return to the textbook, and review the pages in the chapter that pertain to your selected topic.
  • Log in to the Ashford University Library and conduct a search on that topic.
    • The INF103 tutorial will walk you through the basic steps of doing a search for scholarly sources within the Ashford University Library. A transcript of this video can be accessed through your online course.
  • Select two scholarly sources to use in your paper, in addition to the textbook. For each source, write down the author information, date of publication, title of the article, the publication information (journal title), and the database from which you retrieved the article. You will need this information when you create your references for the sources.

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2-1 Basic Estimating Problem Your company is installing a new piece of machining equipment and

2-1 Basic Estimating Problem

Your company is installing a new piece of machining equipment and a robotic arm. Your manager asks for the project costs by cost category as well as the total amount. Given the following information, develop a base cost estimate by grouping costs by Equipment / Material (items 1 – 4), Installation / Labor (items 5 and 6), and Overhead (items 7-9).

1. Two pieces of equipment costing $ 15,000 and $ 35,000
2. Material required for electrical hook-up is 400 feet at $ 25 per foot
3. Controls for each piece of equipment are estimated at $ 600 each
4. Required start-up material is 3,700 pounds at $ 2.70 per pound
5. Company labor for installation requires two maintenance specialists for two days at eight hours per day and $ 35 per hour
6. Contract labor is estimated at a fixed price of $ 7,500
7. Engineering is estimated to be 15% of (equipment / material) cost based on past experience
8. Inspection is estimated to be 3% of (labor) cost based on past experience
9. General and Administrative expenses are estimated to be 5% of the total of (equipment / material) and (labor) based on past experience.

Note: For this problem, only items 5 and 6 are considered “labor” for the purpose of calculating items 8 and 9.

Check answer: Total project cost = $94,737.60

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A reliable File Transfer Protocol (FTP) using UDP.

Write and post client and server programs to implement a reliable File Transfer Protocol (FTP) using UDP. Your program should take the following into consideration:

 

  • The client will request chunks of a file from the server. If the client does not receive some chunks back after a certain period of time, the client will ask for those chunks again.
  • The client can request multiple chunks of data in one request and can handle multiple replies from the server.
  • The client should be able to handle overlapping chunks of data, find missing chunks, and only request missing data, not the entire window worth of data, to be retransmitted.
  • The client will send a request message to the server and then wait for data messages in reply. If the client does not receive a valid response before a time-out occurs, it will retransmit the request. If, however, the client receives some valid replies, it will transmit a request for missing data in each gap before requesting for new data. A retransmission request is made in each gap before requesting for the new data. Retransmission is done for a maximum of four times. A selective retransmission request is considered a separate request.
  • The server will listen at a given port for client requests. If it receives a well-formed request, the server will respond with the data message. However, if the server encounters an error, it will send an error message.

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Define a problem within your current work situation that requires action and the research to resolve. If you do

Define a problem within your current work situation that requires action and the research to resolve. If you do not have a current position select something from an old employer or something you see in your community.
You will Provide:

(1) A Brief description of the type of decision needed to be made

(2) Why you think this needs to be done

(3) What is the impact if it is not done

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ACC – Nutratask, Inc., is a pharmaceutical manufacturer……………

Nutratask, Inc., is a pharmaceutical manufacturer of amino-acid-chelated minerals and vitamin supplements. The company was founded in 1974 and is capable of performing all manufacturing functions, including packaging and laboratory functions. Currently, the company markets its products in the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, and Belgium. Mineral chelation enhances the mineral’s availability to the body, making the mineral a more effective supplement. Most of the chelates supplied by Nutratask are in powder form, but the company has the capability to make tablets or capsules.
The production of all chelates follows a similar pattern. Upon receiving an order, the company’s chemist prepares a load sheet (a bill of materials that specifies the product, the theoretical yield, and the quantities of materials that should be used). Once the load sheet is received by production, the materials are requisitioned and sent to the blending room. The chemicals and minerals are added in the order specified and blended together for two to eight hours, depending on the product. After blending, the mix is put on long trays and sent to the drying room, where it is allowed to dry until the moisture content is 7 to 9 percent. Drying time for most products is from one to three days. After the product is dry, several small samples are taken and sent to a laboratory to be checked for bacterial level and to determine whether the product meets customer specifications. If the product is not fit for human consumption or if it fails to meet customer specifications, additional materials are added under the direction of the chemist to bring the product up to standard. Once the product passes inspection, it is ground into a powder of different meshes (particle sizes) according to customer specifications. The powder is then placed in heavy cardboard drums and shipped to the customer (or, if requested, put in tablet or capsule form and then shipped). Since each order is customized to meet the special needs of its customers, Nutratask uses a job-order costing system. Recently, Nutratask received a request for a 300- kilogram order of potassium aspartate. The customer offered to pay $8.80 per kilogram. Upon receiving the request and the customer’s specifications, Lanny Smith, the marketing manager, requested a load sheet from the company’s chemist. The load sheet prepared showed the following material requirements:
Material
Amount Required
Aspartic acid
195.00 kg
Citric acid
15.00
K2CO3 (50%)
121.50
Rice
30.00
The theoretical yield is 300 kg.
Lanny also reviewed past jobs that were similar to the requested order and discovered that the expected direct labor time was 16 hours. The production workers at Nutratask earn an average of $6.50 per hour plus $6 per hour for taxes, insurance, and additional benefits.
Purchasing sent Lanny a list of prices for the materials needed for the job.

Material Price
per Kilogram

Aspartic acid
$5.75
Citric acid
2.02
K2CO3
4.64
Rice
0.43
Overhead is applied using a companywide rate based on direct labor dollars. The rate for the current period is 110 percent of direct labor dollars. Whenever a customer requests a bid, Nutratask usually estimates the manufacturing costs of the job and then adds a markup of 30 percent. This markup varies depending on the competition and general economic conditions. Currently, the industry is thriving, and Nutratask is operating at capacity.
Required:
1. Prepare a job-order cost sheet for the proposed job. What is the expected perunit cost? Should Nutratask accept the price offered by the prospective customer? Why or why not?
2. Suppose Nutratask and the prospective customer agree on a price of cost plus 30 percent. What is the gross profit that Nutratask expects to earn on the job?
3. Suppose that the actual costs of producing 300 kg of potassium aspartate were as follows:
Direct materials:

Aspartic acid
$1,170.00
Citric acid
30.00
K2CO3
577.00
Rice
13.00
Total materials cost
$1,790.00
Direct labor
$ 225.00
Overhead
247.50
What is the actual per-unit cost? The bid price is based on expected costs. How much did Nutratask gain (or lose) because of the actual costs differing from the expected costs? Suggest some possible reasons why the actual costs differed from the projected costs.
4. Assume that the customer had agreed to pay actual manufacturing costs plus 30 percent. Suppose the actual costs are as described in Requirement 3 with one addition: an underapplied overhead variance is allocated to Cost of Goods Sold and spread across all jobs sold in proportion to their total cost (unadjusted cost of goods sold). Assume that the underapplied overhead cost added to the job in question is $30. Upon seeing the addition of the underapplied overhead in the itemized bill, the customer calls and complains about having to pay for Nutratask’s inefficient use of overhead costs. If you were assigned to deal with this customer, what kind of response would you prepare? How would you explain and justify the addition of the underapplied overhead cost to the customer’s bill?

romantic attachment styles.

There are three primary romantic attachment styles. One quick way to discover your romantic attachment style is to choose which of the following descriptions best describes you. Take a minute to do this:

Secure attachment style: I find it relatively easy to get close to others and am comfortable depending on them and having them depend on me. I do not often worry about being abandoned or about someone getting close to me.

Avoidant attachment style: I am somewhat uncomfortable being close to others. I find it difficult to trust them completely and difficult to allow myself to depend on them. I am nervous when anyone gets too close, and often, love partners want me to be more intimate than I feel comfortable being.

Anxious/ambivalent attachment style: I find that others are reluctant to get as close as I would like. I often worry that my partner does not really love me or will not want to stay with me. I want to merge completely with another person, and this desire sometimes scares people away. (Kenrick, Neuberg, & Cialdini, 2007 p.270)

In a 2- to 3-page paper discuss the following:

    • Based on the above descriptions what romantic attachment style best describes you?

 

    • How has this attachment style affected your past and/or current relationships?

 

    • How has this attachment style also affected your non-romantic relationships?

 

    • Is your romantic attachment style similar to the attachment style you had with your parents when you were young?

 

    • If it is the same why do you think it has not changed? If it is different what experiences as an adult do you think lead to this change?

 

    • What type of situations might an adult experience that would shift their childhood attachment style to a different adult romantic relationship style?

 

    •           Secure (as a child) to anxious/ambivalent (as an adult)

 

  •           Avoidant (as a child) to secure (as an adult)

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