Project Leadership Roles at TriHealth Case Study

Assignment Instructions –  Project Leadership Roles at TriHealth

Read the case titled: “Project Leadership Roles at TriHealth” found in Chapter 3.  This assignment is about developing a specific project team for TriHealth.

Write a six to eight (6-8) page paper in which you:

  1. Identify the common roles in a human resource project. Then, analyze these roles to typical human resource functions.
  2. Reorganize any two (2) roles at TriHealth that result in shared responsibilities and then state why you chose those two roles.
  3. Suggest the short-term and long-term effects on the company with roles being shared among employees.
  4. Analyze the need for an additional role. Then, propose a new role and its proposed impact.
  5. Use at least four (4) quality academic (peer-reviewed) resources in this assignment.

Your assignment must:

  • Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

Sample Answer – Project Leadership Roles at TriHealth

All human resource projects share particular roles, or stakeholders. Each of the roles relates to specific human resource functions. The functions include project team, and executive sponsor, among others. A project team is the set of persons that plans and executes a given project (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin, 2011; Westcott, 2005). The team consists of a various members led by a project leader, or manager. A project leader, or manager, is charged with making certain that the team completes the project. He or she develops the necessary project plans and manages the performance of the team. He or she secures the acceptance, as well as approval, of the attendant deliverables from stakeholders and the project’s sponsor. The members of the project team execute given tasks as well as generate the deliverables (Harrison & Lock, 2004; Westland, 2007).

A project’s sponsor is commonly the project’s most senior manager, who is evidently interested in its outcomes. The sponsor secures the resources, including personnel, and spending authority required in the project. The sponsor champions the project visibly and vocally and serves as the project’s topmost decision-maker. He or she supports the project’s leader, or manager. As well, he or she is the ultimate determiner of the project’s scope alterations and phase approvals. A project’s leader, or manager, is charged with overseeing its day to day management. He plans and develops its deliverables, manages its schedule and budget, and manages its management procedures.

Most projects have steering committees, which champion them visibly and vocally. They approve the projects’ deliverables, addressing emerging issues and formulate the relevant policy decisions (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). They approve project scope alterations and offer guidance and direction to the projects. A project’s customers are entities that in due course require the services, or products, developed by it. The customers may elect their representatives into the team overseeing its development over time. A project’s vendors provide the extra services, or products, which it requires. A project’s analyst makes certain that the needs that a project’s clients have are determined, as well as documented, appropriately before they are addressed.

At TriHealth, the project leader and project executive sponsor are roles that can be reorganized easily and efficiently into a single role. They can be merged into a single role since they have many shared human resource functions. As noted earlier, the two roles are either complementary or collaborative. For instance, a project’s sponsor supports the project’s leader, or manager in various ways. While the leader develops the necessary project plans and manages the performance of the team, the sponsor is the project’s topmost decision-maker as regards the plans and the performance. While the leader secures the acceptance, as well as approval, of the attendant deliverables from stakeholders and the project’s sponsor, the sponsor secures the related spending authorities (Harrison & Lock, 2004; Westland, 2007).

Particularly, in the case of TriHealth, the project leader, and TriHealth project executive sponsor roles are collaborative as regards the reviewing and providing feedback on the project’s process model deliverable. They are collaborative as regards the reviewing and providing feedback on the project’s data model deliverable. As well, they are collaborative as regards the reviewing and providing feedback on the project’s requirements traceability matrix deliverable. The two roles should be merged into a project sponsor role with an expanded mandate. The persons charged with the role will handle the process model deliverable, data model deliverable, and requirements traceability matrix deliverable exclusively. He or she will create, as well as approve, the requirements management plan deliverable. As well, he or she will provide input, as well as approve, the requirements report deliverable.

The sharing of particular roles in among a company’s staff members has several short-term, as well as lasting impacts on it. When the sharing is suitably implemented, as well as implemented, into the company, it contributes considerably to employee hiring, as well as retention, which benefits the company (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). The sharing enables the company to retain experienced, as well as skilled, staff. It motivates older employees to continue working for longer. The company gains from the increasingly pooled experience, saving the resources it would have used in getting extra skills. Experienced employees benefit the company with their diverse perspectives within given jobs, creating greater potential for enhancing efficiency and solving problems (Harrison & Lock, 2004; Westland, 2007).

The sharing reduces staff absenteeism as fewer and fewer employees ask for sick leaves. Sick leave requests are commonly less among employees sharing roles than among employees who execute given roles on their own. Those sharing roles are commonly capable of covering each other’s annual, as well as sick, leave. The company experiences enhanced productivity as well as performance. The shorter the working duration, the more intensely employees can work. When roles are shared, companies increase their potential for saving on equipment along with office space, optimize staff strengths, and afford themselves openings for offering broader operation hours. As well, the companies experience heightened discretionary effort, and are capable of providing employees with appropriate alternatives to repetitive work, possibly occasioning delayed or lower turnover than normal (Harrison & Lock, 2004; Westland, 2007).

The sharing of particular roles in among a company’s staff members has several short-term, as well as lasting impacts on own employees. Owing to the sharing working parents become capable of maintaining their positions at work, without losing the benefits typifying the positions (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). The employees experience enhanced life-work balances and workplace flexibility. When employees share in the execution of given roles, their unit-work performances go up and they become more and more innovative.

In the case of TriHealth, the sponsor should be assisted in championing the project visibly and vocally, approving the projects’ deliverables, addressing emerging issues, and formulating the relevant policy decisions. The sponsor should be assisted in approving project scope alterations, and offering guidance and direction to the projects. He or she can get such a range of assistance from a project steering committee (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). TriHealth should provide for the steering committee role. The committee will heighten the pace at which the sponsor approves the projects’ deliverables, addresses emerging issues, and formulates the decisions. The project will benefit from an increased provision of cross-functional direction and leadership and management governance (Harrison & Lock, 2004; Westland, 2007).

Share with your friends
Order Unique Answer Now

Add a Comment