Forensic Testing

Forensic testing deals with the use of technology in analysis samples collected from the crime scenes to identify people and get evidence to be used in court. It is predominantly concerned with the testing for identity (Butler, 2005). Forensic testing is thus the DNA testing that is done for solving criminal cases. Forensic testing should be used in instances that involve a dead end where investigators cannot continue with proper investigations unless the samples at the scenes are sent to the lab for DNA testing. It provides law enforcers with the ability to use scientifically identified tests carried in the lab to determine possible suspects and thus enhances the process of solving crimes (TIlstone et al., 2006). Regarding ethical concerns, the samples at the scenes may not possibly be those of the suspects and when the information from the tests is mishandled innocent people suffer may suffer. Evidence can be planted in the field making the tests complex and even lead to wrong conclusions. Omissions or errors can result in false convictions since offensive evidence is greatly esteemed in court. The tests are usually carried out in the lab using equipment for testing DNA and are typically done in civil or criminal cases. Civil cases may involve the identity of a father or mother while in criminal investigations it is done to Help in coming up with results regarding people that can be helpful in concluding cases.

Best practice in forensic testing requires that the evidenced personnel be honest and report their examinations accurately to prevent any unlawful arrests of innocent people when evidence is used in a court of law Joelle, Alex & Franco, 2014) . Therefore, information should be given to conclusively analyzing it to get better information on it. In pathological forensics, anything related to the autopsy regarding information about the autopsy and the various tests were done should be carefully recorded.

Share with your friends
Order Unique Answer Now

Add a Comment