Regents of University of California Vs Allan Bakke – Plaintiff And Argument Presented

In Regents of the University of California v Bakke of 1978, the target of the case is discrimination in education. The case involves the admission practices at Davis Medical School of the University of California. Davis medical school had reserved 16 percent of its seats for minorities during admissions. The minority groups under consideration include Asians, Blacks, American Indians, and Chicanos. This rigid admissions quota was seen as a form of discrimination towards the Whites who were willing to join Davis Medical School. In the programme, all non-minority and minority applicants were to compete equally for the remaining 84 percent of the seats (The Supreme Court, 2007).

A White applicant, Allan Bakke, was denied admission to Davis Medical School twice due to his race although he had significantly high marks in the GPA, MCAT, and benchmark scores. In the case, Allan Bakke , the plaintiff, decided to challenge the admissions programme of the University of California. According to Bakke, the admission programme used by the Davis Medical School of the University of California violated his rights. By rejecting him on the basis of his race, Allan Bake argued that his rights were violated under the equal protection clause. By developing the special admission programme, the school wanted to integrate the medical profession, counter discrimination, increase the number of medical professionals willing to work in underserved areas, and to obtain educational benefits from ethnically diverse students. The Supreme Court however ruled that it was unconstitutional for Davis Medical School of the University of California to use racial quotas in its admission process. However, using a special admission system to admit more applicants from minority groups was legal in some circumstances (The Supreme Court, 2007).

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