WRTG 391: The Political Debate of Stem Cell Research – Critical Annotated Bibliography

Agha, F. & Hayani, A. (2008). Muslim perspectives on stem cell research and cloning.

Zygon, 4(43), 783-795.

The article projects Muslims as acquiring knowledge as a worship practice. Muslims hold the opinion that human attainments should be in line with the will of God. Ideally, the attainments should remain within the limits set out by God’s confines and laws. Given the dread of disregarding the equilibrium set out by God and arrogance, all the new discoveries and knowledge should be applied cautiously not to destroy the creation’s balance. Knowledge ought to be applied to establish the political senses of justice and equity for everyone. Such senses should be linked to the wide-ranging ethical foundation that the Sunnah and the Quran set forth. The article would be rather helpful in the upcoming study since it presents very significant insights into the religious basis of the political considerations that Muslims have regarding stem-cell technologies, including cloning. As well, the article presents very significant insights into the ethical basis of the political considerations that Muslims have regarding stem-cell technologies, including cloning.

Baertschi, B. & Alexandre, M. (2010). Moral Status Revisited: The Challenge Of Reversed

Potency. Bioethics, 24(2), 96-103.

The article presents moral status is a troublesome subject. The subject is intricately connected to continuing political contentions regarding abortion’s morality and ensoulment. In recent days, the subject has become quite closely associated with the controversies that define embryonic stem cell research presently. In the latest context, the subject draws benefits from the fresh insights stemming from the latest scientific progress in the research. The researchers indicate that the freshly seen somatic cells’ ability to come back to pluripotential statuses in regulated environments necessitates the modification of the classical moral status concepts and its reconsideration as referring to both intrinsic and relational, or extrinsic, properties. The article would be rather helpful in the upcoming study since it presents very noteworthy insights into the political considerations that color thoughts regarding the classical moral status concepts. In an energizing way, the article projects the concepts, which by themselves constitute a troublesome subject, as intricately connected to the enduring political contentions on abortion’s morality as well as ensoulment.

Dresser, R. (2010). Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy

Conversation. The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 38(2), 332-341.

Dresser (2010) seeks to . The article would be rather useful in informing research on the political considerations that should guide the research in the days ahead especially regarding scientific integrity, resource allocation, and the relevant civic bioethical debates.

States, H. (2013). Foundations Lead the Way After Bush Vetoes Stem Cell Bill. Science,

313(5786), 420-421.

States (2006) seek to report on and discuss a period in the US’ history in which there were pronounced political efforts geared towards legally obligating stakeholders to increase the number of lines of human embryonic stem cells to researchers benefiting from federal funds through the H.R. 810 bill. The bill was carried by the Senate after a marked political push and pull, but President Bush vetoed it. Critics of the president’s veto argued that it signaled the stepping into a period in which state governments along with private establishments would take up increased responsibility for biomedical research funding. The veto made advocates of stem cell research, including Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger of California, feel pumped up. States (2006) reports that Schwarzenegger thought of the veto as having invigorated the CIRM (California Institute of Regenerative Medicine) program. States (2006) presents rather helpful insights into how varied political interests continue to shape and drive stem cell research.

Kao, C., Chuang, C., Chen, C. & Kuo, H. (2008). Human pluripotent stem cells: Current

status and future perspectives. The Chinese Journal of Physiology, 51(4), 214-225.

The article seeks to demonstrate that from when human embryonic stem cells e the introduction of factors, which have been defined genetically, into mature somatic cells and the production of human embryonic stem cells out of lone blastomeres. The different ways have helped in resolving the principal problems intrinsic in typical human embryonic stem cells. The article would be rather useful in informing research on how political considerations persuade the development of new stem research methods and technologies such as the GWCIPST (Genome-Wide Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation-Sequencing Technology).

Varnee, M. (2009). Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Decade of Debate from Bush to

Obama. The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 82(3), 101-103.

Varnee (2009) is keen on reporting and demonstrating that there have varied differences in how different US presidencies have handled stem cell research issues in the past. Varnee (2009) demonstrates that the research intensely discussed and considered by US presidents. There is a marked likelihood that the research will continue being intensely discussed and considered by US presidents.

Okie, S. (2006). Stem-Cell Politics. New England Journal of Medicine, 355(16), 1633-1637.

Okie (2006) Around the same time, Senator John Danforth from Missouri was quoting the bible in support of human embryonic stem-cell research. Okie (2006) as well examines the political developments that happened around the same time in various other areas, including Wisconsin. Okie (2006) presents rather helpful insights into how varied political interests continue to shape and drive stem cell research.

Robertson, J. A. (2010). Embryo Stem Cell Research: Ten Years of Controversy. Journal

of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 38(2), 191-203.

Roberts (2010) seeks to present an appraisal of a decade of the debates regarding stem cell research and explore the ethical conflicts that have added to the controversies relating to embryonic stem cells. As well, Roberts (2010) seeks to show how the controversies have played themselves out in legal, as well as political, circles. There have been varied political efforts geared towards making the research and the related therapies unconstitutional. Roberts (2010)

Shannon, T. (2001). From the Micro to the Macro. In S. Holland, K. Lebacqz & L. Zoloth

(eds.), The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate (pp.177-184).Cambridge: MIT Press.

Shannon (2001) seeks to discuss the macro, as well as micro, ethical issues or concerns that have defined stem cell research in the past. As well, Shannon (2001) seeks to demonstrate that the related therapies are typified by varied macro, as well as micro, ethical issues or concerns. The micro concerns relate to the conditions of the specific organisms that produce the extracted stem cells. The macro concerns relate to dedication to specific high-tech therapies and medicine that are meant for use by the well off by and large but are commonly neglected. The author contends that there are moral justifications, or reasons, for extracting the cells from the embryonic tissues of human beings. Even then, there are significant social concerns that urge caution in the extraction of the cells and the research as a whole. The article would be rather useful in informing research on how specific political, ethical, as well as social, considerations persuade the development of new stem research methods.

Solter, D. (2006). Politically Correct Human Embryonic Stem Cells? New England Journal

of Medicine, 354(11), 1209.

Solter (2006) seeks to prove the Altered Nuclear Transfer principle and support cloning for the production of patient-particular embryonic stem cells. Solter (2006) seeks to show that the Altered Nuclear Transfer mice experiment was of inconsequential since the transfer’s validity was incapable of being verified in given human embryos. He expresses reservation about the possible establishment of the CDX2 role in placentation in human beings, consequently leaving unaddressed the efficacy of the approach defined by the Altered Nuclear Transfer. Solter (2006) presents an appraisal of past debates regarding stem cell research and explore the ethical conflicts that have added to the controversies relating to embryonic stem cells. As well, Solter (2006) shows how the debates and the related conflicts have played themselves out in legal, as well as political, circles. Solter (2006) presents rather supportive insights into how varied political interests continue to shape and drive stem cell research.

Sulmasy, D. P. (2009). Deliberative Democracy and Stem Cell Research in New York State:

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, 19(1), 63-78.

Sulmasy (2009) seeks to demonstrate the dynamics that have colored the adoption of human embryonic stem cell research policies in recent times. Some states have come up with the policies via political, legislative processes. Other states have come up with the policies via political referenda. Other states have come up with the policies via political executive orders. Sulmasy (2009) demonstrates that they are varied strengths, as well as downsides, associated with the various ways used to coming up with such policies. The varied strengths, as well as downsides, relate to accountability, publicity, and reciprocity, which are deliberative democracy concepts and ideals. Sulmasy (2009) as well shows how the debates and the related conflicts have played themselves out in legal, as well as political, circles. Sulmasy (2009) presents rather supportive insights into how varied political interests continue to shape and drive stem cell research. Besides, the article would be rather useful in informing research on how specific democracy considerations persuade the development of new stem research methods.

Wiedemann, P., Simon, J., Schicktanz, S. & Tannert, C. (2004). The future of stem-cell

research in Germany. EMBO Reports, 5(10), 927-931.

The researchers are keen on assessing the social, therapeutic, as well as scientific, prospects of adult along with embryonic stem cell research in Germany. They establish that varied ethical challenges are typifying the research. As well, they establish that there are varied expectations regarding the social, therapeutic, as well as scientific, prospects of adult along with embryonic stem cell research in the country. The state prefers stem-cell research based on adult cells over the one based on embryonic cells. Even then, most German experts expect that the country will become more and more accommodating regarding stem-cell research based on embryonic cells in future. In addition to expecting that the country will become more and more accommodating regarding stem-cell research based on embryonic cells in future, most German experts expect the country to continue relaxing the related legal restrictions. The article would be useful in the upcoming research since it would help explain how various political dynamics define how state power is exercised with respect to the research.

 

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