1619-1965 African American Civilization

Multiple events affected the American political status from 1619 to 1965. The events led to the decolonization of American and eventual freedom of the black people. According to various sources, the first African sources could have arrived in the country around 1620. The following two centuries characterized intense slavery and slave trade. Able and strong African men and women were taken to the Americas to work as gardeners, constructors, domestic workers, and entertainers.

However, these events changed in 1808 where there was a subsequent ban on trans-Atlantic slave trade. Although the banning was appropriate, the slaves already in the Americas were facing significant problems. For that reason, in 1850 the Congress initiated the fugitive slave act, therefore criminalizing slave trade. The subsequent years were followed by intense political rivalry between the northern slave sympathizers against southern gangs, the Klu Klux Klan. In 1861, a Civil War began between the two factions. In January 1, 1863, Emancipation Proclamation was engaged. In 1863, the Civil War ended. The Congress further developed the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery. In 1865, the American Civil War ended harmonizing the two factions.

As a gesture of unity, in 1866, Klu Klux Klan established a missionary association at Fisk University in Nashville. In 1876-1896, the Congress and the Supreme Court mentored a number of laws that sought an end to racism (Fandrich, 2007, p. 1249). In fact, by 1909, black people were able to form their political parties. In 1954, the Supreme Court presided over Brown v Board of Education prohibiting segregation. Subsequently, in 1955, mass protest took American cities by storm for arrest of Rosa Parks. Rosa Park refused to give up her seat to a white man. In 1964, Civil Rights Act passed enabling more rights in voting. In 1965, the 13th Amendment was established.

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