Human Services Practice in Criminal Justice versus Mental Healthcare Settings

Differences

  •  While the human services practice’s subjects, or clients, in mental healthcare settings seek and get specific human services out of own volition, the clients in criminal justice contexts are obligated to get services (Cohen, 1985).
  •  While the human services practice’s subjects, or clients, in mental healthcare settings have no motivation, or interest, to lie to human service practitioners about own investments, goals, conduct, or related variables, those in criminal justice contexts are keen on presenting themselves as favorably as possibly to the practitioners.

 

Similarities

  • The same cadres of paraprofessionals and professionals offer human services in both criminal justice environments and in mental healthcare environments (Abramsky, Fellner, Saunders & Ross, 2003).
  • The paraprofessionals and professionals in the two environments hold the same generic skills, attitudes, and knowledge. For instance, they all appreciate human systems’ nature and appreciate the circumstances that limit or enhance the systems’ performances

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