Do People Adjust Their Behavior And Presentation Of The Self To Affect Opinion Of Others?

This paper discusses the question of whether or not people adjust their behavior and presentation of the self in order to affect the opinion of others. It is essential to note that everyone exercises self-presentational behavior. According to Chambliss and Eglitis (2013), this is the kind of behavior that people present with the intention of modifying, creating, and/or maintaining a certain impression of their selves in the minds/thoughts of others. It is, therefore, factual that people do engage in self-presentation all the time so that they can influence the views of other people about them in a particular way. It is worth noting that self-presentation is a pervasive aspect of social life given that people do spent most their time in the company of others. In this case, it becomes natural for an individual to want to influence the perception of others regarding him or her.

It is correct to argue that people have different selves that they present in different social settings. According to the arguments of Chambliss and Eglitis (2013), people seem different to others, and in different social settings. Each individual has one self, but they can have a variety of sub selves that do come out in different social settings or contexts. For instance, people can present themselves in a different manner when they go a political rally, and have different self-presentational behavior in charge. These multiple sub selves that appear in different social settings relate closely with Goffman’s concept of front and back stage behavior. It is sure indication that people cannot have a constant self-presentational behavior in different social settings. People can embrace crucial emissions, strategic ambiguity, and innuendo as communication techniques in different social settings. According to Goffman’s concept of idealization, an individual socializes his or her performance to societal statuses and expectations, which society finds honorable and desirable (Chambliss & Eglitis, 2013). In this case, an individual performs a role, which underplays his/her actual worth or wealth so that a particular end can be achieved.

In conclusion, this paper discussed the question of whether or not people adjust their behavior and presentation of the self in order to affect the opinion of others. It is worth noting that self-presentation is a pervasive aspect of social life given that people do spent most their time in the company of others. It is correct to argue that people have different selves that they present in different social settings

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