School Desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957-1958 Vs Boston Massachusetts in 1963-1974

American History

The process of ending group separations usually with reference to races is termed as desegregation. In 1957-158 and in 1963-1974, steps towards desegregation were taken in Little Rock, Arkansas and Boston Massachusetts respectively. School desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas and in Boston Massachusetts had one major similarity. In both Little Rock Arkansas and Boston Massachusetts, there was an increase in the number of Black students attending school. Initially, students in these schools were all whites and African American students were not allowed to learn in the same schools with the whites (Global security, 2000).

However, school desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas and Boston, Massachusetts had got one major difference. The difference was observed in the number of African American students enrolled in each school during the desegregation years. In Little Rock, Arkansas a total of 17 students had been selected to join the Central High School which only consisted of white students in 1957. Unfortunately, only nine Black students were successfully enrolled, and out of the nine, only three returned when schools were opened (Global security, 2000). On the contrary, there was a higher number of African American students who were enrolled in Boston Massachusetts than those who were enrolled in Little Rock Arkansas. In Boston, desegregation occurred in elementary schools, junior high schools and in high schools. Between 1971 and 1972, student enrollment in Boston Massachusetts had grown with 7 percent of the students being other minorities, 32 percent blacks, and 61 percent whites. The number of students from other races in Boston Schools was almost equal to those of white students, with an increase in enrollment every subsequent year (United States Commission on Civil Rights, 1975).

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