President Andrew Jackson From The Perspective of an American Citizen in 1837

I am a 48-year old land broker based in Fredericksburg, Virginia. I have always viewed President Andrew Jackson as a levelheaded leader since he ascended to our country’s presidency. Even then, presently, he is coming off as tenuous in dealing the current countrywide panic. Up to 1835, he initiated reforms that saw my fortunes and those of other businesspeople rise significantly (Sellers, 1958).

As we match towards 1838, I hope that he will persuade our legislators to review the acts that appear to have made our economy nosedive in such a short duration. Especially, to ensure that my land dealership business returns to profitability, the legislators should repeal the Specie Circular (Borneman, 2008). It appears that the president meant well for the business community by supporting the enactment of the Specie Circular. Just like him, I was persuaded that the circular would have lessened speculative business practices and stabilized the American economy. Even then, the circular has me and many of my friends in business unable to settle credit backed by silver along with gold.

The president can turnaround the fortunes of the business community by becoming high accessible to it as he was in 1829. That year, he was so close to the community that he became the first American president to extend invitations to ordinary businesspersons and the public in general to the White House, for a presidential inauguration. I was among the ordinary Americans who witness the inauguration of the president on 4th March, 1829, at the US Capitol’s East Portico. With me at the US Capitol’s East Portico were many underprivileged Americans donning homemade clothes. The crowd at the inauguration’s venue was so big that it broke many decorative pieces at the venue. I stood on a rickety chair about 30 meters away from where the president was throughout the inauguration event. The invitations are responsible for the marked popularity that the president has enjoyed to the present times.

Besides, the president has remained rather popular with the masses owing to many of the reforms that he has initiated over the years, especially those aimed at fighting corruption. Many Americans particularly support him for his continuous efforts towards purging public authorities and agencies from the corrupt practices associated with his predecessors’ administrations (Sledright & Afflerbach, 2000). His government has committed huge sums of public finances to the control of particular public officials, who are now recruited on merit. The president has made it clear that the officials can only remain in office if they are stringent on how they handle the finances. I am happy that the president supported the resignation of Postmaster Barry who has mismanaged our mail services and expressed favoritism and collusion in the award of highly rewarding public tenders.

Even though the many Americans still supports the president regardless of the ongoing economic panic, they are becoming increasingly worried that he may soon be assassinated. In 1833, Robert Randolph, who was dismissed by our naval forces for corruption, attacked the president physically. Two years ago, Richard Lawrence, a jobless English house painter, fired at the president. Fortunately, he missed him. I am yet to understand how President Jackson managed to settle the whole national debt in 1835. Notably, I am as well yet to understand how low we have sunk as a country in just two years.


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