Interview Strategy Example

This is an interview strategy you would consider using to interview and select the right candidate for your organization. The interview strategy example gives

  •  A detailed description of the time, place, format, interview type, and employees involved in the actual interview process.
  • At least one testing option to be included in the selection process, Explaining why this testing option is best suited for the selection process.
  • A minimum of four situational and four behavioral interview questions that you would use to interview for both jobs.

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Interview Strategy Example

Selection Process

The two interviews will take place on 22nd September 2020 at the company’s boardroom, whereby the first one will happen in the morning (09:30) and the second in the afternoon (14:00). Regarding the type and format of the interview, an unstructured panel interview will suffice. In a panel interview, a job candidate answers questions from a group of people who afterward decide the best candidate to hire (Uzair, Majeed, & Shakeel, 2017). The purpose of this approach is to ensure that the hiring decision is informed by a relatively greater perspective and is unbiased. As for the format, in unstructured interviews, the interviewers usually have particular topics that they wish to cover, but there is no specific set of predetermined questions. Thus, the interviews flow like an everyday conversation and, as such, tend to be open-ended (Uzair, Majeed, & Shakeel, 2017). Using this format will allow the interviewers to dive into more in-depth discussions, improvise relevant interview questions, and effectively adapt to changing topics. The employees involved in the actual interview process include two individuals from the human resource department, two people from the finance department, and two persons from the Purchasing and Supply department. The finance and customer support experts will help the human resource office determine if the applicants’ skills, experience, and personality meet the jobs requirements based on positions’ responsibilities.

Testing Options

Two testing options that will feature in the selection process include skills assessment and emotional intelligence evaluation tests. Skills test helps interviewers assess the job candidates; thus, it will help the panel determine whether the applicants have the required skills to perform the jobs (Hughes, 2019). For instance, for the data analyst position, the test will help the interviewers assess applicants’ ability to compile and manage data in multiple systems, their understanding of navy terminology systems, and their ability to maintain organizational stock and inventory control, etcetera. On the other hand, for the customer support position, the assessment will help the panel determine job candidates’ will help the interviewers evaluate applicants’ ability to meet the needs of customers, their capability to respond to questions and concerns regarding material on-hand and on-hand deliveries, ability to speak in groups of customers regarding changes, orders, and material handling.

The emotional intelligence test will help the interviewers evaluate applicants’ self-awareness, how they perceive other people’s emotions, adaptability, self-regulation, and social skills. According to Noe, Hollenbeck, Gerhart, and Wright (2017), emotional intelligence encompasses traits such as teamwork, adaptability, and interpersonal relations. The panel will assess job candidates’ emotional intelligence through questions about past experiences and hypothetical scenarios. Depending on how the applicants solve an emotionally heated hypothetical situation, the interviewers can gauge their suitability for the job positions. Notably, the interviewers must pay attention to both the verbal answers and the applicants’ body language to assess the constructiveness of their answers and how relaxed they are when solving a hypothetical scenario or reflecting past experiences.

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Situational and Behavioral Questions

It is crucial to incorporate both situational and behavioral questions in an interview to ensure thoroughness. Notably, situational questions present applicants with hypothetical situations and require them to explain how they would handle the situations. On the other hand, behavioral questions ask candidates to recall an experience and describe how they handled it. Below are some of the situational and behavioral questions to include in both the data analyst and customer support positions.

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Data Analyst Position Situational Questions:

  1.  Could you explain how you would handle a scenario involving suspected or missing data?
  2. Describe how you would deal with a situation entailing a multi-source problem?
  3. Tasked to compile and manage data in multiple systems, what are the various steps you would take in an analytics project?
  4. If presented with a sensitivity analysis in the decision-making process, how would you perform the task?

Data Analyst Position Behavioral Questions:

  1. Could you tell us about a time you encountered messy data and how you dealt handled the problem?
  2. In the past, how have you ensured accurate predictions using data correlations?
  3. Have you ever handled information technology or network troubleshooting? How did you go about it?
  4. What is the most challenging database problem you have faced? How did you handle the issue?

Customer Support Position Situational Questions:

  1. What is the best way to assist a customer who has worked with multiple customer support agents and has not received the help they need?
  2. If you are dealing with a customer that you find difficult to understand, how would you handle the interaction?
  3. How would you approach the situation where a customer reports technical issues that you do not know the answer to?
  4. When responding to a client, how do you decide which information to include and what to leave out?

Customer Support Position Behavioral Questions:

  1. Can you tell me about a time when there was a significant problem with your company’s product/service, and you had to respond to the customer without having all the facts yet?
  2. Have you ever bent the guidelines/rules in assisting a client/ Tell me about the occurrence and the outcome?
  3. Tell me about a time you dealt with an unreasonable customer and how you handled the case?
  4. Tell me about the time you were proudest of the level of customer support you provided?
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