A Modernized Version of “The Miller’s Tale”

Author’s Note

The present project entails the rewriting of a fairy-tale penned many centuries ago to suit the contemporary reader. The modernization of such fairy-tales is now a full-scale trend, having the attention of all. They are modernized to pass their timeless messages to succeeding generations albeit in reorganized formats.

Introduction

The present project entails the rewriting of “The Miller’s Tale” to suit the modern-day reader. It was written in the 14th century. The reconstruction of “The Miller’s Tale” is aimed at passing its timeless messages to succeeding generations even though in reorganized formats (Wheeler 2-9). The tale explores the various humiliations that double-crossing men suffer. As well, it explores the torment the men put married, faithful individuals through.

“The Millers’ Tale”

Some years back, an opulent carpenter, John, living within Oxford offered guests boarding services. He hosted a poor liberal arts scholar, Nicholas, who had marked interest in astrology. The scholar helped men resolve various astrological and relationship concerns. Nicholas was crafty, timid, and mysterious regarding own abilities. He led a friendless life within his chamber, which was covered with aromatic herbs. The chamber has stacks and stacks of books. He played captivating melodies in the chamber using a hospitable set of psaltery. John was alive with love for his adorable wife, Alisoun, whom she guarded rather aggressively. He saw himself as a probable cuckold. Observably, the wife was not his equal as regards age.

He did not appreciate the age-old counsel that one should tie the knot with her or his equal. He had a rasping wit. He got himself into the noose that was Alisoun. Thus, he had to live the soreness that defined the noose. Alisoun was by all standards fair-haired, trim, and elegant. Her eyes were lecherous under her black, domed eyebrows. She cherished singing, which she did dazzlingly and animatedly. The crafty Nicholas could not defend himself against the temptation to make love to rich host’s consort when the host visited Osney. Alisoun resisted Nicholas’ plea that they make love faithfully. Even then, she gave in over time. She warned Nicholas that unless he kept their wicked escapade undisclosed, her green-eyed John would not falter to send her to the other world. After making love, Nicholas promised to keep the exploit top secret. He petted Alisoun’s limbs while kissing her overpoweringly. He played her a melody on the psaltery gleefully.

The exploit between the cunning Nicholas and the eye-catching Alisoun happened on a venerated day. The attention-grabbing Alisoun moved into the church on the same day, looking fairly bright. Absalom, a church clerk, as well visited the church on the same day. He had a grand body, wavy hair, gray eyes, and a flushed complexion. He went to the church with an immaculate censor. He incensed the ladies the church attentively, longing to make love to the most dazzling ones, including Alisoun. To him, Alisoun came off as a lusty, apposite, and charming lover. That nighttime, the ebullient, as well as amorous, Absalom went to the green-eyed John’s house, to articulate his blazing love for Alisoun. Absalom was aware that John was away. He believed that night was his just-right occasion to have Alisoun in his arms.

Absalom accessed Alisoun’s bedroom window and begged her to no less than kiss him. Alisoun stuck her generous behind past the window, onto Absalom’s face. Devoid of hesitation, Absalom kissed Alisoun’s rear end. After realizing what he had so single-mindedly kissed, Absalom began seething with vehemence and disgust. He started harboring manifest extreme dislike against her. He was keen on exerting payback on her. Meanwhile, Nicholas and Alisoun hatched a plan to spend an entire night together. Nicholas, whom John believed to have consummate seer capabilities, warned the carpenter of by all accounts theoretically looming floods. He warned the carpenter that the only way to save himself, the seer, and the gorgeous Alisoun was to make boxes to serve them as their safe houses when the floods at last hit their region.

As ordered by the seer, the carpenter made the safe houses and hung them on the roof of his house. The seer ordered that everyone should have kept quiet when in his or her safe house, immersed in prayers. When the flood came, the seer was to scream, “Water!” Upon hearing the seer shout, the carpenter was to cut down the chains holding the safe houses in place, to allow the three to sail to safety and enjoyment. The seer promised that the three would have had the entire world to themselves after surviving the flood. On the material night, the green-eyed carpenter, the devious seer, and the fine-looking Alisoun went up into their safe houses.

In the shadowy night, the cunning seer, and the good-looking Alisoun came out of their safe houses and went to have a quality time in the carpenter’s bedroom. Meanwhile, the carpenter prayed, implored God to save them but was ultimately overpowered by sleep. As he snored from the safety of his safe house, Alison made love to Absalom. That night Absalom came along to the window to avenge Alisoun’s action against him. He called out Alisoun’s name, telling her to unfasten the window to get a gold-made ring he had brought to her. The furtive seer was aware of what Alisoun had done to the clerk the last he came to that very window.

Nicholas offered to offer the clerk the same treatment that night. Unknown to the seer, the clerk Held a red-hot metallic rod determinedly in his hands. Like the good-looking Alisoun previously, Nicholas stuck his behind past the window, before Absalom’s face. To improve on her performance, the seer broke wind in Absalom’s face. As if in unison, Absalom thrust the blistering rod between the seer’s buttocks. The seer could not stand the ensuing pain serenely, he cried out deafeningly, asking that his behind be doused with water. That woke the carpenter from his sleep. He clearly heard the seer shout, “Water!” He took that to be announcement of the promised flood’s commencement. He promptly cut the chains, causing the tumbling of the safe houses, including his own. He was injured gravely and lost consciousness. The next day, he talked of the Noah’s flood when his neighbors visited. The crafty Nicholas and the beautiful Alisoun told the neighbors that carpenter had run round the bend (Wheeler 4-47). The Miller’s tale ends here.

Conclusion

The present project entails the rewriting of a fairy-tale, “The Miller’s Tale”, which was written ages ago to improve its relevance to the present-day reader. The transformation of such fairy-tales now has all persons’ attention. The transformation of fairy-tales to suit modern readership helps communicate their timeless messages to succeeding generations. The original and updated versions of “The Miller’s Tale” look at the variety of disgraces suffered by traitorous men and those with intense protectiveness in relationships.

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